Tag Archives: Best Practice

eDiscovery in SharePoint 2013 – An Introduction

SharePoint-2013

More and more organizations face more and more litigations. Whether they are shareholder lawsuits, fraud cases, or competitive investigations, litigation cases have proven to be costly, time consuming, and business disruptive. The new eDiscovery solution of SharePoint 2013 could really help organizations to lower eDiscovery costs, mitigate risks of data tempering or accidental deletion, and minimize business interruption.

In a series of blog articles I’ll show you the benefits of eDiscovery in SharePoint 2013, the architectural concept of the solution, some important implementation considerations, how to get eDiscovery to work technically in both an on-premises situation and in Office 365, and I’ll walk you through an eDiscovery case lifecycle.

But let’s start at the beginning:

What is eDiscovery?

Electronic discovery is the process to identify, preserve, search, process, and produce electronic content or electronically stored information (ESI) for a legal request or investigation.

Basically when we start a new eDiscovery case, we first want to look for possible relevant data, and make sure this data is not tampered with from that moment on (put it on hold). Next we would want to further refine the data set, do a legal review of this information, and then produce it for use in any legal investigation, compliance audit or policy enforcement in the organisation. Finally, when we are ready with the case, we wouldn’t want to forget to release the hold and formally close the case. In a diagram, this whole process would look as follows:

121813_1246_eDiscoveryi1

In SharePoint 2013 (and Exchange 2013), Microsoft did a major overhaul of their eDiscovery solution, resulting in a great tool to support this whole eDiscovery process, without disrupting regular business.

Benefits of using SharePoint 2013 for eDiscovery

With SharePoint 2013 it is possible to run an eDiscovery case on SharePoint, Exchange, Lync, and File Shares (on premises only) at the same time, from one unified central management console. That means it is possible to search, preserve (not for File Shares, we’ll get to that), and export all relevant content of all these repositories from one place.

In SharePoint 2010 it was already possible to perform an eDiscovery process, but this was only SharePoint content related. Exchange 2010 had its own eDiscovery tools. Also, when we would put a site on hold in SharePoint 2010, users would no longer be able to work on the contents of this site. So this was considered a rather business disruptive method.

In SharePoint 2013 these limitations are no longer there. Here’s an overview of what SharePoint 2013, together with Exchange 2013 and Lync 2013, can do for you when it comes to eDiscovery:

  1. SharePoint 2013 has new site templates for both an overall eDiscovery Center, and individual eDiscovery Cases. For every discovery case, you would create a new case site where it is possible to conduct searches, place content on hold, and export content. In addition, you can associate the following things with each case:
    1. Sources: Exchange mailboxes, SharePoint sites, or file shares from which content can be discovered.
    2. eDiscovery Sets: Combinations of sources, filters, and whether to preserve content. eDiscovery Sets are used to identify and preserve content.
    3. Queries: The search criteria, such as author, date range, and free-text terms, and the scope of the search. Queries are used to identify content to export.
    4. Exports: A list of all of the exports that were produced that relate to the case.
  2. With SharePoint 2013 it is possible to centralize eDiscovery management for multiple SharePoint farms, Exchange servers, and File shares. There are a few caveats here, which we will discuss in Part 2 of this blog series when we talk about architectural concepts and considerations (for example, it is not possible to centralize management for a hybrid environment with SharePoint on-premises and SharePoint Online), but as long as you can add a content source or result source to SharePoint Search, you can discover the content from one console.
  3. When you’ve created your eDiscovery Set and did a first general search for all possible relevant content, you probably want to put that content on hold before you start refining your searches and exporting the final content. You want to make sure that whatever happens with the content from that moment on, the original content stays available for your legal case. From the eDiscovery Center it is possible to put SharePoint 2013 sites and/or Exchange 2013 mailboxes on hold, without disrupting the business. End users shouldn’t be affected when content is put on hold and with SharePoint 2013, they’re not. As soon as a SharePoint 2013 site is put on hold, a hidden Document Library is created. Next, when a user modifies or deletes a content item subject to the legal hold, this is still possible for the user, but the original copy of the content item is copied to that hidden Hold Library. In Exchange 2013 mailboxes the same principle is applied by creating a hidden folder where items are actually moved to when a user deletes an item.
  4. From the SharePoint 2013 eDiscovery Center it is possible to export the results of a search for later import in another review tool. Together will all the exported content, an XML file is created which complies with the Electronic Discovery Reference Model (EDRM) specification. So when external (legal) teams use other tools that also comply with this standard, they can easily import the content and use their own tool for further review and analysis. The following content is included in an export:
    1. Documents: Documents are exported from file shares. Documents and their versions (optional) are exported from SharePoint.
    2. Lists: If a list item was included in the eDiscovery query results, the complete list is exported as a comma-separated values (.csv) file.
    3. Pages: SharePoint pages, such as wiki pages or blogs, are exported as MIME HTML (.mht) files, including styling and mark-up.
    4. Exchange objects: Items in an Exchange Server 2013 mailbox, such as tasks, calendar entries, contacts, email messages, and attachments, are exported as a .pst file.
  5. eDiscovery in SharePoint 2013 is rather quick to set up, and easy to use. Of course you need to do some configuration to get SharePoint and Exchange to work together, but this is fairly easy (as you’ll see in one of the next posts in this series). Also, because using the eDiscovery Center is very straightforward, there is no longer the need to burden the IT department with collecting all relevant content in the organization during an eDiscovery process. Legal teams can now be empowered to perform searches and exports themselves. They are able to respond quickly and in full fidelity with real-time data access. Of course there is the matter of governance here, how to handle the required permissions to be able to discover all relevant content, but that’s the case for IT people as well.

Summary

In this post I’ve tried to briefly explain the concept of eDiscovery and what a typical eDiscovery process would look like. Also, I’ve pointed out what’s new in SharePoint 2013 (and Exchange 2013) regarding eDiscovery and how the new eDiscovery Center could really help organizations to quickly respond to cases without disrupting business as usual.

In the next few blog posts I’ll dive more into the architectural concepts of Microsoft’s eDiscovery solution, I’ll talk about some important implementation considerations, how to get eDiscovery to work technically in both an on-premises situation and in Office 365, and I’ll walk you through an eDiscovery case lifecycle.

Ref : eekels

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Free SharePoint 2013 eBooks

SharePoint-2013

Looking for new and free SharePoint reference books? This eBook collection will certainly satisfy your appetite for improvement in SharePoint technology field. There’s plenty of valuable tutorials here to keep you busy reading for a while. Be sure to grab few of these eBooks, check more related goodies at the bottom and don’t forget to tell us what you think.

SharePoint 2013 WCM Advanced Cookbook

Buy the paper bookSharePoint 2013 Server includes new and improved features for web content management that simplify how you design publishing sites, and enhances the authoring and publishing processes of organizations.

With SharePoint 2013 WCM Advanced Cookbook, you will learn about a full-fledged web content management system using Microsoft SharePoint Server 2013.

Publisher: Packt Publishing

By: John Chapman

Published Year: 2014
Pages: 436
Download PDF (7 MB)
Buy the paper book version


SharePoint 2013 Branding and User Interface Design

Buy the paper bookIf you are planning, designing, and launching your brand using SharePoint, this book and author trio will walk you through everything you need to know in an understandable and approachable way.
This visual book provides step-by-step instructions in a simple and striking format that focuses on each of the tasks you will face in your own branding project.

Publisher: Wrox
By: Randy Drisgill, John Ross, Paul Stubbs
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 432
Download PDF (54 MB)
Buy the paper book version


Pro SharePoint 2013 App Development

Buy the paper bookUsing step-by-step tutorials, author Steve Wright creates a sample SharePoint app throughout the course of the book, and you can walk with him through the entire lifecycle of a SharePoint app.

Publisher: Apress
By: Steve Wright
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 432
Download PDF (15.5 MB)
Buy the paper book version


Microsoft SharePoint 2013 App Development

Buy the paper bookLed by two SharePoint experts, you’ll learn development techniques such as building app lists, creating event handlers, and the major classes in the object model that provide access to content stored in SharePoint.

Publisher: Microsoft Press
By: Scot Hillier, Ted Pattison
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 202
Download PDF (34 MB)
Buy the paper book version


Pro SharePoint 2013 Branding and Responsive Web Development

Buy the paper bookPro SharePoint 2013 Branding and Responsive Web Development is the definitive reference on the technologies, tools, and techniques needed for building responsive websites and applications with SharePoint 2013. The book focuses on solutions that provide the best browser experience for the myriad of devices, browsers, and screen orientations and resolutions.

Publisher: Apress
By: Eric Overfield, Rita Zhang, Oscar Medina, Kanwal Khipple
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 580
Download PDF (26 MB)
Buy the paper book version


Microsoft SharePoint 2013: Designing and Architecting Solutions

Buy the paper bookDetermine the best design for your SharePoint implementation by gaining a deeper understanding of how the platform works. Written by a team of SharePoint experts, this practical guide introduces the Microsoft SharePoint 2013 architecture, and walks you through design considerations for planning and building a custom SharePoint solution. It’s ideal for IT professionals, whether or not you have experience with previous versions of SharePoint.

Publisher: Microsoft Press
By: Shannon Bray, Miguel Wood, Patrick Curran
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 488
Download PDF (55 MB)
Buy the paper book version


SharePoint 2013 User’s Guide, 4th Edition

Buy the paper bookMicrosoft SharePoint 2013 provides a collection of tools and services you can use to improve user and team productivity, make information sharing more effective, and facilitate business decision–making processes. In order to get the most out of SharePoint 2013, you need to understand how to best use the capabilities to support your information management, collaboration, and business process management needs. The SharePoint 2013 User’s Guide is designed to provide you with the information you need to effectively use these tools.

Publisher: Apress
By: Anthony Smith
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 536
Download PDF (53 MB)
Buy the paper book version


Microsoft SharePoint 2013 Inside Out

Buy the paper bookYou’re beyond the basics, so dive right into SharePoint 2013—and really put your business collaboration platform to work! This supremely organized reference packs hundreds of timesaving solutions, troubleshooting techniques, and workarounds. It’s all muscle and no fluff. Discover how the experts facilitate information sharing across the enterprise—and challenge yourself to new levels of mastery.

Publisher: Microsoft Press
By: Darvish Shadravan, Penelope Coventry, Thomas Resing, Christina Wheeler
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 904
Download PDF (124 MB)
Buy the paper book version


Pro SharePoint 2013 Administration, 2nd Edition

Buy the paper bookPro SharePoint 2013 Administration is a practical guide to SharePoint 2013 for intermediate to advanced SharePoint administrators and power users, covering the out-of-the-box feature set and capabilities of Microsoft’s collaboration and business productivity platform.

Publisher: Apress
By: Robert Garrett
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 655
Download PDF (32 MB)
Buy the paper book version


Professional SharePoint 2013 Administration

Buy the paper bookThe new iteration of SharePoint boasts exciting new features. However, any new version also comes with its fair share of challenges and that’s where this book comes in. The team of SharePoint admin gurus returns to presents a fully updated resource that prepares you for making all the new SharePoint 2013 features work right. They cover all of the administration components of SharePoint 2013 in detail, and present a clear understanding of how they affect the role of the administrator.

Publisher: Wrox
By: Shane Young, Steve Caravajal, Todd Klindt
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 840
Download PDF (56 MB)
Buy the paper book version


Practical SharePoint 2010 Branding and Customization

Buy the paper bookWith Practical SharePoint 2010 Branding and Customization, SharePoint branding expert Erik Swenson cuts through the fluff and discusses accessible, easy-to-understand consulting and processes to create aesthetically pleasing, highly usable branded and customized SharePoint websites, both internally and externally. Designed to be a quick reference, how-to guide that lets you dive straight into the task at hand, you’ll find this book’s attention to detail and pragmatism make it an attractive companion during your branding experience.

Publisher: Apress
By: Erik Swenson
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 368
Download PDF (7 MB)
Buy the paper book version


Professional SharePoint 2013 Development

Buy the paper bookA team of well-known Microsoft MVPs joins forces in this fully updated resource, providing you with in-depth coverage of development tools in the latest iteration of the immensely popular SharePoint. From building solutions to building custom workflow and content management applications, this book shares field-tested best practices on all aspect of SharePoint 2013 development.

Publisher: Wrox
By: Reza Alirezaei, Brendon Schwartz, Matt Ranlett, Scot Hillier, Brian Wilson, Jeff Fried, Paul Swider
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 816
Download PDF (47 MB)
Buy the paper book version


Exploring Microsoft SharePoint 2013

Buy the paper bookYour guide to the most significant changes in SharePoint 2013. Discover what’s new and what’s changed in SharePoint 2013—and get a head start using these cutting-edge capabilities to improve organizational collaboration and effectiveness.

Led by a Microsoft MVP for SharePoint, you’ll learn how to take advantage of important new features and functionality, including app development, collaborative social enterprise tools, enhanced versioning, themes, improved search, and an extended client object model.

Publisher: Microsoft Press
By: Penelope Coventry
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 200
Download PDF (17 MB)
Buy the paper book version


SharePoint 2013 For Dummies

Buy the paper bookSharePoint Portal Server is an essential part of the enterprise infrastructure for many businesses. Building on the success of previous versions of SharePoint For Dummies, this new edition covers all the latest features of SharePoint 2013 and provides you with an easy-to-understand resource for making the most of all that this version has to offer. You’ll learn how to get a site up and running, branded, and populated with content, workflow, and management. In addition, this new edition includes essential need-to-know information for administrators, techsumers, and page admins who want to leverage the cloud-hosted features online, either as a standalone product or in conjunction with an existing SharePoint infrastructure.

Publisher: Wiley
By: Ken Withee
Published Year: 2013
Pages: 384
Download PDF (32 MB)
Buy the paper book version

If you are unable to download email me

Ref : topsharepoint

SharePoint Tasks List plus Project – Better Together

SharePoint tasks lists provide a great way to collaborate and stay up to date on the status of your projects. By using Microsoft Project Professional, you can take your project management to the next level by using more advanced features like scheduling and even create gorgeous and comprehensive reports. In a way, the SharePoint site and its tasks lists are where team members can view and edit the progress of their tasks, and Project Professional is where project managers can manage the progress of their projects. SharePoint tasks list sync empowers you to use the great functionalities of both Project and SharePoint tasks lists, at the same time.

You can create a new SharePoint tasks list that supports tasks with hierarchy, and indent/outdent those tasks while typing them in SharePoint, using the Alt+shift+Right/Left shortcuts. Then, in order to sync this SharePoint tasks list with Project, all you need to do is select the “Open with Project” button in the List tab of the ribbon:

1

This will open your tasks list along with the timeline view in Project Professional and you’ll even be started in a screen that walks you through 3 steps to show you how you can take advantage of the powerful features of Project:

2

And when you switch to the Gantt view, you can see the same tasks list as was in SharePoint:

3

You can continue editing the project plan in Project, and when you hit Save, Project will automatically sync the plan with the SharePoint tasks list, and also save the project file (.mpp) in the Site Assets library of the SharePoint site. Therefore, every time you, or any other project manager, open the project plan, you can view the most recent status of the project. In 2013, we are saving an up to date project file in the Site Assets library so that users won’t have to deal with multiple conflicting or out-of-date project files. Moreover, we have greatly improved the conflict resolution mechanism so we now look for conflicts at the cell-level instead of the task-level.

Accessing and re-opening this project is very easy: if you are in the SharePoint site, you can open the same project plan by selecting the “Open with Project” button. Alternatively, if you already have Project Professional open, you can find this project in the Recent Projects list in the Open tab:

4

Using the SharePoint tasks list feature, you can also convert standalone project plans into SharePoint tasks list and start collaborating with other team members on those plans. For instance, if you are using Project Professional to manage a special launch event, you can now go to the Save As tab of the File menu and create a new project site with an associated SharePoint tasks list:

5

This will create a new Project Site and save the project plan in the Site Assets library of that site. From that point on, you can open this this project plan from the tasks list and keep the tasks list and the project plan in sync.

During the SharePoint tasks list sync, we sync the following fields between your SharePoint list and Project by default: task name, start date, finish (due) date, % Complete, resource name, and predecessors. However, if you want to map more fields to be synced between Project and SharePoint, you can do so in the Info tab of the File menu: open the “Map Fields” dialog, and pick any new fields that you’d like to sync. This way, you can have your team members report on other custom fields, or generate reports based on non-default SharePoint columns.

6

Ref : Office Blogs

Sync Project with a SharePoint tasks list

Project can sync a list of tasks with SharePoint – without using Project Web App. Your team members can view the schedule and update their work in SharePoint, and you’ll see the change’s in Project. And vice-versa

Sync with a new SharePoint site

These steps assume you have a project open in Project, but you haven’t made a SharePoint site for it yet.

  1. In Project, click File > Save.
  2. In the Sync with list, select New SharePoint Site.
  3. In the Project name box, type a name.
  4. In the Site Address list, add the address of the SharePoint tasks list that you will sync to.
    Don’t use an address that contains the name of the Tasks List. Project ads that part automatically.ZA102830693
  5. Click Save.

Here’s what will happen: When you click Save, a new SharePoint site is created for the project. Changes you make to tasks in Project are reflected in SharePoint, and vice-versa.

Sync with an existing SharePoint site.

These steps assume you have a blank schedule open in Project, but all the tasks you want to sync to are on a SharePoint site somewhere.

  1. In Project, click File > Save.
  2. In the Sync with list, select Existing SharePoint Site.
  3. In the Site Address box, type the address of the SharePoint tasks list that you want to import.
     NOTE    Don’t use an address that contains the name of the Tasks List. Project adds that part automatically.
  4. Click Verify Site.
  5. In the Tasks List box, type or select a name for the tasks list that you want to sync with your project.ZA102830282
  6. Click Save.

When you click Save, the tasks list in SharePoint will now appear in Project. Changes you make to the list of tasks in Project will be reflected in SharePoint, and vice versa.

Ref : Microsoft Office

Resolving VS 2010 solution deployment issues for SharePoint 2010 projects

In my new SharePoint 2010 book, I touch base on variety of deployment approaches; in this article I wanted to focus on Visual Studio 2010 feature allowing to deploy SharePoint 2010 solutions right to the portal. However, you haven’t configured your development environment properly – you will run into issues. Here I’m talking about the following error:

Error occurred in deployment step ‘Recycle IIS Application Pool’: The local SharePoint server is not available. Check that the server is running and connected to the SharePoint .

Or this:

Error occurred in deployment step ‘Recycle IIS Application Pool’: Cannot connect to the SharePoint site: http://localhost/. Make sure that this is a valid URL the SharePoint site is running on the local computer. If you moved this project to a new computer or if the URL of the SharePoint site has changed since you created the project, update the Site URL property of the project

Visual studio uses the following process to deploy your solution: vssphost4.exe
Open your task manager and find the process in the list; take a note of the User Nameunder which this process is running, let’s say it’s myadmin_account

Now, open your SQL Management Studio and ensure this Username is added as a DBOWNER to the following databases:

SharePoint_Config
SharePoint_AdminContent_[guid]
SharePoint Site Content DB

sql-permissions

Close and Open your Visual Studio again, this will ensure the service is recycled; this should fix above deployment error. If you’re still having same issue, End the process in taskmanager and then VS 2010.

Good luck!

Ref : Sharemuch

How to Identify the Version and Service Packs installed on a SharePoint 2013 Server

In many cases, we may not be bothered about the Version, Service Packs installed on our Server when we do the development. It is obvious that, when we get the requirement, immediately we will start analysis the requirement.

But recently there was a situation that one of our client wants to move on to the new Service Pack which released on this April. In that case, we may also have to analyze the impact of the new Service Pack. Before knowing that, I just wanted to know, what are the things installed on our Dev environment first. Then on top of it, what needs to be installed and what would be the impact after installation.

To answer all these questions, First we need to know what is the version installed on our Farm. Use the following command to get the Version of the product installed using PowerShell script.(Get-SPFarm).Products.

First Run ISE as below :

Run_ISE_as_Administrator

Then after selecting the Commands of “Add.PSSnapin” output of the above command will be something like,Get-SPFarm_Products

By seeing the GUID, we will be able to identify the Product. These GUIDs will not change. On all the environments, and all the machines, the GUIDs will remain same.

Here are all of the product GUIDs:

GUID : 35466B1A-B17B-4DFB-A703-F74E2A1F5F5E Product : Project Server 2013

GUID : BC7BAF08-4D97-462C-8411-341052402E71 Product : Project Server 2013 Preview

GUID : C5D855EE-F32B-4A1C-97A8-F0A28CE02F9C Product : SharePoint Server 2013

GUID : CBF97833-C73A-4BAF-9ED3-D47B3CFF51BE Product : SharePoint Server 2013 Preview

GUID : B7D84C2B-0754-49E4-B7BE-7EE321DCE0A9 Product : SharePoint Server 2013 Enterprise

GUID : 298A586A-E3C1-42F0-AFE0-4BCFDC2E7CD0 Product : SharePoint Server 2013 Enterprise Preview

GUID : D6B57A0D-AE69-4A3E-B031-1F993EE52EDC Product : Microsoft Office Web Apps Server 2013

GUID : 9FF54EBC-8C12-47D7-854F-3865D4BE8118 Product : SharePoint Foundation 2013

And to know about the Service Packs, there is no need of any PowerShell Commands. That we can directly go to the Central Administration and find.

Go to Central Administration.image1

Click on “Upgrade and Migration” on the Quick Links. image2

Click on “Check Product and Patch Installation Status”image3

This will tell us the current Patches Installation. By seeing the Version column we can identify. On the screen shot above shared, there is no SP installed.

SharePoint 2010 Best Practice Overview Page

SharePoint 2010 Best Practices (en-US)

The SharePoint 2010 Best Practice Overview page just underwent a major overhaul and here’s the result:

Reference : SharePoint 2010 Best Practices (en-US)